What are the risks?

  • Meat Products
  • Egg products
  • Seafood
  • Horticulture
  • Dairy Products
  • Meat Products
  • Physical
    • Hair/Feathers/Hide
    • Bone
    • Metal
    • Plastic
    • Wood
    • Glass
    • Ingesta
    • Dirt/Stones
    • Bullets/Lead shot/Needles
  • Chemical
    • Pesticides
    • Antibiotics
    • Hormones
    • Mycotoxins
    • Bacterial toxins
    • Fertilisers
    • Fungicides
    • Heavy metals
    • PCBs
    • Colour additives
    • Inks
    • Packaging materials
    • Direct food additives (e.g. preservatives, nitrites, flavour enhancers, colour additives)
    • Processing aids
    • Lubricants
    • Paints
    • Coatings
    • Sanitisers
    • Cleaners
    • Other chemicals via cross-contamination
    • Allergens (e.g. gluten)
  • Biological
    • Bacterial
      • Bacillus cereus
      • Campylobacter jejuni
      • Clostridium botulinum
      • Clostridium perfringens
      • Escherichia coli (EHEC/STEC)
      • Listeria monocytogenes
      • Salmonella spp.
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • Yersinia enterocolitica
    • Zoonotic parasites
      • E.g. Cryptosporidium spp.
      • Trichinella spiralis
      • Ascaris lumbricoides
    • Viral
      • Norovirus
      • Hepatitis A/E
      • Rotavirus
  • Egg products
  • Physical
    • Shell
    • Feathers
    • Metal
    • Plastic
    • Wood
    • Glass
    • Faecal matter
    • Dirt/Stones
    • Cardboard/Paper
  • Chemical
    • Pesticides
    • Antibiotics
    • Hormones
    • Mycotoxins
    • Bacterial toxins
    • Fertilisers
    • Fungicides
    • Heavy metals
    • PCBs
    • Colour additives
    • Inks
    • Packaging materials
    • Processing aids
    • Lubricants
    • Paints
    • Coatings
    • Sanitisers
    • Cleaners
    • Other chemicals via cross-contamination
  • Biological
    • Bacterial
      • Bacillus cereus
      • Campylobacter jejuni
      • Clostridium botulinum
      • Clostridium perfringens
      • Escherichia coli (EHEC/STEC)
      • Listeria monocytogenes
      • Salmonella spp.
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • Yersinia enterocolitica
    • Viral
      • Norovirus
      • Hepatitis A/E
      • Rotavirus
  • Seafood
  • Physical
    • Shell
    • Scales
    • Bone
    • Metal
    • Plastic
    • Wood
    • Glass
    • Ingesta
    • Dirt/Stones
  • Chemical
    • Shellfish toxins
    • Ciguatoxin
    • Scombrotoxin (histamine)
  • Biological
    • Bacterial
      • Bacillus cereus
      • Campylobacter jejuni
      • Clostridium botulinum
      • Clostridium perfringens
      • Escherichia coli (EHEC/STEC)
      • Listeria monocytogenes
      • Salmonella spp.
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • Yersinia enterocolitica
    • Zoonotic parasites
      • Giardia spp.
    • Viral
      • Norovirus
      • Hepatitis A/E
      • Rotavirus
  • Horticulture
  • Physical
    • Metal
    • Plastic
    • Wood
    • Glass
    • Dirt/Stones
  • Chemical
    • Pesticides
    • Antibiotics
    • Hormones
    • Mycotoxins
    • Bacterial toxins
    • Fertilisers
    • Fungicides
    • Heavy metals
    • PCBs
    • Colour additives
    • Inks
    • Packaging materials
    • Direct food additives (e.g. preservatives, nitrites, flavour enhancers, colour additives)
    • Processing aids
    • Lubricants
    • Paints
    • Coatings
    • Sanitisers
    • Cleaners
    • Other chemicals via cross-contamination
    • Allergens (e.g. gluten)
  • Biological
    • Bacterial
      • Bacillus cereus
      • Campylobacter jejuni
      • Clostridium botulinum
      • Clostridium perfringens
      • Escherichia coli (EHEC/STEC)
      • Listeria monocytogenes
      • Salmonella spp.
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • Yersinia enterocolitica
    • Viral
      • Norovirus
      • Hepatitis A/E
      • Rotavirus
  • Dairy Products
  • Physical
    • Hair/Hide
    • Bone
    • Metal
    • Plastic
    • Wood
    • Glass
    • Ingesta
    • Dirt/Stones
  • Chemical
    • Pesticides
    • Antibiotics
    • Hormones
    • Mycotoxins
    • Aflatoxins
    • Bacterial toxins
    • Fertilisers
    • Fungicides
    • Heavy metals
    • PCBs
    • Colour additives
    • Inks
    • Packaging materials
    • Direct food additives (e.g. preservatives, nitrites, flavour enhancers, colour additives)
    • Processing aids
    • Lubricants
    • Paints
    • Coatings
    • Sanitisers
    • Cleaners
    • Other chemicals via cross-contamination
    • Allergens (e.g. gluten)
  • Biological
    • Bacterial
      • Bacillus cereus
      • Campylobacter jejuni
      • Clostridium botulinum
      • Clostridium perfringens
      • Escherichia coli (EHEC/STEC)
      • Listeria monocytogenes
      • Salmonella spp.
      • Staphylococcus aureus
      • Yersinia enterocolitica
      • Brucella spp.
      • Mycobacterium bovis
    • Zoonotic parasites
      • E.g. Cryptosporidium spp.
      • Trichinella spiralis
      • Ascaris lumbricoides
    • Viral
      • Norovirus
      • Hepatitis A/E
      • Rotavirus

Food Safety Schemes

A food safety scheme is a legal document developed in consultation with government and industry. A scheme is based on reducing food safety risks through-chain. It is a preventative approach that ensures public health and safety.
In simple terms, a food safety scheme is a regulation that sets out minimum requirements that a primary production and/or processing business must legally meet to make sure its food is safe.

It may be a requirement under a food safety scheme for a person to develop and implement a food safety program or management statement. A food safety program is one of many regulatory tools that can be adopted to assist businesses in meeting their legal requirements.
  • Meat Products
  • Egg Products
  • Seafood
  • Horticulture
  • Dairy Products
  • Meat Products

The State’s Meat Food Safety Scheme was introduced in 2002 and is one of the first schemes for Queensland.

Queensland’s meat industry encompasses a diverse range of production and processing activities, including slaughtering, meat processing and wild game harvesting. It also covers the manufacture of ready-to-eat products, such as smallgoods and the production and processing of poultry meat.

  • Egg Products

The Queensland Egg Food Safety Scheme has been in place since 2005.

The National Egg Standard developed by Foods Standards Australia New Zealand and introduced in late 2012 is modelled on the Queensland Egg Scheme.

Queensland’s egg industry is comprised of both a number of large processing and distribution businesses, as well as approximately 86 egg production farms.

  • Seafood

The seafood scheme was introduced in 2009 and was the first Food Safety Scheme to adopt, in its entirety, a Primary Production and Processing Standard from chapter 4 of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code.

Queensland seafood has long had a world-class reputation and the industry is a major contributor to export income. Safe Food engages with around 200 seafood processors, cold stores, fishing vessels and aquaculture farms (eg. oyster farmers).

  • Horticulture

The National Primary Production & Processing (PPP) Standard for Seed Sprouts came into effect on 12 July 2013.

Based on an evaluation of risk conducted by Safe Food, a new scheme was introduced for horticulture covering only seed sprouts in order for Queensland to meet its obligations in relation to the adoption of the National Standard.

  • Dairy Products

The Food Safety Scheme for Dairy Produce started on 1 January 2003 with the introduction of the first iteration of the Food Production (Safety) Regulation 2014.

The Scheme outlines the food safety requirements for the production and processing of dairy products in Queensland. It also gives effect to the National Standards for Primary Production and Processing of Dairy Products and Specific Cheeses (Standards 4.2.4 and 4.2.4A of the Australia New Zealand Food Standard Code).

Do I need an accreditation?

If you produce, process or transport meat, dairy, eggs, seafood or horticulture you may be required to have an accreditation with Safe Food.

If you are required to have an accreditation with Safe Food, you need to demonstrate how you manage food safety risks in your day-to-day operations. You can do this by completing a food safety program or management statement as part of your accreditation requirements. You must be accredited with Safe Food before you can legally supply or sell your product in Queensland.

Please note: an accreditation can only be issued in the name of an individual or an incorporated body (an ACN registered company).
  • Meat Products
  • Egg Products
  • Seafood
  • Horticulture
  • Dairy Products
  • Meat Products

An accreditation is required for the following activities:

  • Handling of an animal at a place where the animal is killed for meat
  • Processing meat or smallgoods intended for human consumption
  • Handling, packaging or storing meat or a meat product
  • Transporting meat obtained from an animal, at any stage from a place where the animal is killed to a retailer of the meat
  • Transporting meat obtained from an animal, at any stage from a place where the animal is killed to premises where meat from the animal is processed to produce smallgoods, a pet meat product or rendered product
  • Retail sales of prepackaged meat or a prepackaged meat product if the package is sold opened
  • Retail sales of meat and a meat product from the following:
    • meat retail premises
    • a meat retail vehicle

An accreditation is not required for the following activities:

  • Rearing an animal to be killed for meat
  • Growing, mixing, sorting or transporting stock food for consumption by an animal to be killed for meat
  • Handling or transporting an animal, at any stage before the animal arrives at an abattoir where the animal is killed
  • Handling or transporting smallgoods or a rendered product after the smallgoods or product leave the premises where the smallgood or product is processed
  • Retail sales of prepackaged meat or a prepackaged meat product if the package is sold unopened

The Meat and Meat Products Scheme provides for the following categories of accreditation. If you undertake multiple activities you may require more than one accreditation.

  • Processor

    You need this accreditation if you are processing meat in any way. Processing includes slaughtering animals to produce meat or meat products. Processing meat or meat products includes chilling, curing, drying, freezing, packaging or smoking the meat or meat products.

  • Cold Store

    You need this accreditation if you are storing meat under refrigeration to extend the storage life of the product, but are not involved in any form of processing of the product.

  • Retailer

    You need this accreditation if you are processing meat or meat products and you predominately supply meat from retail premises. For example, butcher shops and supermarkets.

  • Field Depot

    You need this accreditation if you use a premise for refrigerating and storing of wild game but do not process it.

  • Mobile Field Depot

    You need this accreditation if you refrigerate and transport wild game carcasses to a field depot or processor. Mobile Field Depots must be fitted with suitable equipment to monitor locations of time and temperature. Details of these requirements are available from Safe Food.

  • Transporter

    You need this accreditation if you transport chilled meat or meat products between any premises (including to the back dock of a retail outlet, manufacturer or a commercial user who prepares meat and meat products).

  • Wild game harvester

    You need this accreditation if you kill wild animals for meat such as macropods (e.g. kangaroos) or wild boar for supply to a wild game meat processor.

    A note for wild boar harvesters:

    It is a requirement when applying for an accreditation to harvest wild game that the applicant provide evidence of holding the necessary DERM licence to field harvest macropods. In situations where applicants wish to ONLY harvest wild boar, the following requirements will apply:

    • An application needs to be completed and the fees paid to Safe Food
    • A management statement needs to be completed, signed and submitted by the applicant to Safe Food
    • A statement needs to be submitted, either as part of the management statement or separately, indicating that the applicant will only harvest wild boar. This statement needs to be signed by the applicant and a witness
    • The accreditation will be granted by Safe Food subject to a condition that the holder of accreditation will only be authorised to harvest wild boar
  • Egg Products

An accreditation is required for the following activities:

  • Producing eggs for supply
  • Handling other people’s eggs
  • Washing, grading (including assessing for cracks) another person’s eggs
  • Washing and handling eggs at a wholesale premises (Safe Food policy states that, although the Egg Scheme relates to wholesale premises, they are not required to be accredited if they do not physically handle individual eggs)
  • Processing eggs to produce egg product
  • Pasteurising egg pulp (as long as this activity is included in their food safety program)
  • Operating under a preferred supplier arrangement (PSA) for eggs. A PSA allows approved egg producers to supply eggs exclusively to an egg processor. A producer who is operating under a PSA cannot sell eggs directly to the public, or to anyone else other than the egg processor identified in their accreditation application.

An accreditation is not required for the following activities:

  • Keeping birds as pets and not selling the eggs
  • Using eggs for personal consumption
  • Operating a hatchery and not selling eggs
  • Growing or producing stock feed
  • Being a retailer who sells eggs (except if you sell eggs straight from your farm gate).*

*Queensland Health and your local government look after the retail sale of eggs under the Food Act 2006

The Egg Scheme provides for the following categories of accreditation:

  • Egg Processor

    An egg processor is any person who undertakes one or more of the following activities:

    • anyone who handles other people’s eggs
    • a business that washes, grades (including assessing for cracks) another person’s eggs
    • a person who pasteurises egg pulp
  • Egg Producer

    An egg producer is any person who produces eggs for supply. A producer can do one or more of the following in relation to their own eggs:

    • Grade
    • Wash
    • Candle
    • Oil
    • Pack
    • Store
  • Producer - Preferred Supplier Arrangement (PSA)

    The term ‘preferred supplier arrangement’ identifies a special supply arrangement related to eggs.

    The PSA allows approved egg producers to supply eggs exclusively to a single egg processor as agreed by both parties.

    A producer who is operating under a PSA cannot supply eggs to anyone else other than the egg processor identified in their accreditation application and management statement.

  • Seafood

An accreditation is required for the following activities:

  • Commercial fishing
  • Aquaculture activities
  • Land based seafood processing
  • Oyster growing
  • Oyster picking
  • Storing seafood (cold storage and live fish)

An accreditation is not required for the following activities:

  • Recreational fishing
  • Producing seafood for an end purpose other than for food (e.g. bait, fingerlings, spat)
  • Engaging in the retail sale of seafood and not supplying or distributing seafood in any other way

The Seafood Scheme provides for the following categories of accreditation:

  • Wild animal harvester

    A wild animal harvester accreditation ONLY authorises the harvesting and supply of whole, green product. No form of processing (including gilling, gutting, filleting and cooking) can be undertaken onboard a boat under a wild animal harvester accreditation.

  • Producer

    A producer accreditation allows limited forms of processing such as gilling, gutting, filleting and cooking onboard a boat.

  • Processor

    All land-based processing of seafood requires a processor accreditation under the Seafood Scheme (other than where you are solely retailing). You will also require appropriate authorisation from your Local Council to undertake the activities at that site (town planning permission). Safe Food will need to see evidence of that Council authorisation prior to approving the issue of a processor accreditation.

  • Horticulture

An accreditation is required for the production of horticulture scheme produce, including, for example, the following:

  • decontamination of seed or seed sprouts;
  • soaking of seed;
  • germination or growth of seed;
  • harvest of seed sprouts;
  • washing, drying or packing of seed sprouts

An accreditation is not required for the following activities:

  • retail sales of horticulture produce

The Horticulture Scheme provides for the following categories of accreditation:

  • Processors

    Processors who are involved with the decontamination of seed or seed sprouts; soaking of seed; germination or growth of seed; harvest of seed sprouts; or washing, drying or packing of seed sprouts are required to be accredited with Safe Food.

  • Dairy Products

An accreditation is required for the following activities:

  • Milking an animal at a dairy
  • Processing milk at a dairy
  • Storing milk at a dairy
  • Rearing an animal at a dairy for milking at the dairy
  • Growing stock food at a dairy for consumption by an animal to be milked at the dairy
  • Transporting dairy produce:
    • from a dairy to a factory
    • from a factory to another factory for further processing
    • to or from a depot
    • within a factory
  • Handling or storing milk at a depot before transporting the milk to a factory for processing
  • Processing dairy produce (e.g. pasteurisation, homogenisation, manufacture of cheese)
  • Processing, supplying or selling pet food
  • Treating an animal to be milked at a dairy with drugs and/or pesticides
  • Producing goat milk for human consumption

An accreditation is not required for the following activities:

  • Growing stock food at a place other than a dairy for consumption by an animal to be milked at a dairy
  • Supplying stock food to a dairy for consumption by an animal to be milked at the dairy
  • Transporting stock food to a dairy for consumption by an animal to be milked at a dairy
  • Rearing an animal to be supplied to a dairy for milking
  • Transporting an animal to a dairy for milking
  • Transporting dairy produce from a factory to a wholesaler or retailer
  • Retail sales of dairy produce, other than pet food
  • Manufacturing ice-cream if retail sales of ice-cream are made from the retail premises where ice-cream is produced.

The Dairy Scheme provides for the following categories of accreditation:

  • Processor

    A processor accreditation allows processing of dairy produce received from an accredited dairy producer (e.g. unpasteurised milk) or other accredited processors. It also includes the transportation of product from dairy to a factory, factory to factory or to a depot.

  • Producer

    A producer accreditation authorises the production and supply of raw (unpasteurised) milk. It is a condition of all dairy producer accreditations issued by Safe Food that all milk produced must only be supplied to an accredited dairy processor.

    Note: If you hold an export registration with AQIS you must be accredited with Safe Food for processing of dairy to comply with Queensland law. You will also be required to submit a food safety program or management statement.